icubud: (Vapor Trails)
Did they or didn't they?
Mixed messages out of the WH - Politicizing Iran's nuclear aspirations
icubud: (iron man)
New information revealing the CES is sitting on information about Iran nuclear program until now.
Post here
icubud: (Reagan is calling on you)
Romney made an awesome speech yesterday at VMI. I am including the text of the speech in this post because I want to make sure I have it secured for the future. In it we hear and see the Exceptionalism of the USA. In it is the conviction of Ronald Reagan and all of the best hopes, values and interests of our country. O has had four years to speak and act in such a way that a speech like this by Romney would not be “new” or needed. He didn’t and hasn’t because he does not believe in the exceptionalism of our nation and he is not a leader.

speech


icubud: (iron man)
An interesting article in this morning's NYT about reason and implications for all the protest and violence over the video.

2 cents: it appears that a very limited few see the unreasonableness of their response to the video. Protests do not have to lead to murder or even violence. 
icubud: (iron man)
An interesting article in this morning's NYT about reason and implications for all the protest and violence over the video.

2 cents: it appears that a very limited few see the unreasonableness of their response to the video. Protests do not have to lead to murder or even violence. 
icubud: (Default)
2 cents: Below is an article on today's Fox News website that articulates what I figure will happen with the Muslim Brotherhood and the real purpose of the military's actions before the election and since. If a real democracy is to take root and grow in that country, it will require the threat of military trumping the government and holding them in place. As commented earlier I figure that the actions going on behind the scenes right now with the MB is figuring how best to create cabinet and committees that will be engaged with the military and - ultimately - to infect them and weaken them most probably my creating a schism. It is night time right now (symbolically) in Egypt and the evil always ply their trade in the night.

article:

After thousands of years as the land of the pharaohs and decades under dictators, Egypt could find its experiment with democracy brief, some analysts worry. 

That concern follows the Muslim Brotherhood's wild success at the polls in post-Mubarak Egypt, most recently with the election to the presidency of Brotherhood candidate Mohammed Mursi. He was sworn in over the weekend. 

Kori Schake, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, feels Mursi and the Muslim Brotherhood's rise owes much to Egyptians' dislike of those candidates aligned with Hosni Mubarak and the Egyptian military. But the result is that the second-largest recipient of U.S. foreign aid is now led by a party with past ties to terror group Hamas. 

"With the Islamist parties, because they are revolutionary, that is -- they seek to change the societies as they have been governed -- the fear is that you will get one man, one vote, one time," Schake said. 



icubud: (Default)

WASHINGTON — The United States has quietly moved significant military reinforcements into the Persian Gulf to deter the Iranian military from any possible attempt to shut the Strait of Hormuz and to increase the number of fighter jets capable of striking deep into Iran if the standoff over its nuclear program escalates.

The deployments are part of a long-planned effort to bolster the American military presence in the gulf region, in part to reassure Israel that in dealing with Iran, as one senior administration official put it last week, “When the president says there are other options on the table beyond negotiations, he means it.”

Whole NYT article here



2 cents: More of the same going on over there. This article's purpose IMO is not for the Middle East folk but to attempt to sway voters here in the USA that the CES is tough and wise in his resolution and strategy toward Iran. In other words....propaganda.

 

icubud: (Default)
From Debka: The European oil embargo taking effect Sunday, July 1 blocks the sale to EU members of one-third of Iran’s daily output of 3.3 million barrels a day. From now on, EU insurance firms withhold cover from governments and firms operating tankers delivering Iranian oil. The embargo was clamped down after diplomatic efforts failed to halt Iran’s nuclear weapon program. Gulf armies led by Saudi Arabia are on alert for reprisals.  Two oil pipelines have been activated to bypass the Strait of Hormuz if it is blocked.

2 cents: Will Iran actually do what it threatened - blocking of the Strait of Hormuz? That will lead to military action if the UK and CES then do what they said they would do. What would Russia then do? Interesting times...

icubud: (coffee!)
2 cents: A good article but Friedman is either missing the point deliberately or out of ignorance. The point being in the last paragraph which I have highlighted in red; note the context of the paragraph – it is a mandate, if you will, written by and for Arabs on principles that they believe they need to address and improve in order for their nations and people to thrive. They – the Arab so-called intellectuals and leaders – do not believe Friedman’s insertion (text in red) are principles that need to be adopted and embraced in their countries. My point being that the Muslim Brotherhood in order to fulfill their agenda and beliefs CAN NOT actually allow Friedman’s insertion to be a reality or even seriously entertained by the citizens of Egypt or other Arab countries. Therefore the text highlighted in blue will not be realized as long as they are in power.

Read more... )

icubud: (coffee!)
2 cents: A good article but Friedman is either missing the point deliberately or out of ignorance. The point being in the last paragraph which I have highlighted in red; note the context of the paragraph – it is a mandate, if you will, written by and for Arabs on principles that they believe they need to address and improve in order for their nations and people to thrive. They – the Arab so-called intellectuals and leaders – do not believe Friedman’s insertion (text in red) are principles that need to be adopted and embraced in their countries. My point being that the Muslim Brotherhood in order to fulfill their agenda and beliefs CAN NOT actually allow Friedman’s insertion to be a reality or even seriously entertained by the citizens of Egypt or other Arab countries. Therefore the text highlighted in blue will not be realized as long as they are in power.

Read more... )

icubud: (Default)

The high point of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s noteworthy 90-minute talk with Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu in Jerusalem Monday, June 25, was Putin’s firm assertion that Iran will not get a nuclear bomb. This is disclosed exclusively by debkafile’s Jerusalem and Moscow sources.
He also dismissed reports that the third round in Moscow of six-power talks with Iran (June 18-19) led nowhere, stressing they were serious and substantial. The next round taking place in Istanbul on July for technical discussions is, according to the Russian president, of prime importance. For the first time, he explained, the nuclear negotiations with Iran will get down to the core issues and would therefore of greater significance  than the “Ashton-Jalili” sessions.
(He was referring to European foreign executive Catherine Ashton who chairs the negotiations and Saeed Jalili, senior Iranian negotiator.)
Putin corrected the general impression that Russia has confined itself to the role of passive bystander in the bargaining with Iran: Quite the reverse, he said: Moscow has been proactively working for accord behind the scenes and its “input” to the process “is considerable.”
Although the word “intelligence” was not mentioned, it was clearly intimated by the Russian visitor when he said, “We [Russians] know more about what is going on with regard to Iran’s (nuclear) capabilities than the Americans.”
It was Putin’s way to scoff at Israel for investing so much time and strategic assets in endless wrangling over how to handle the Iranian threat with American security, military and intelligence chiefs, when the Netanyahu government would be better served by sparing a fraction of that time for talking to Moscow.

In conclusion, he stressed to Netanyahu that it was unnecessary for Israel to use military force against Iran’s nuclear program. Israel knows exactly how much Russia has done to prevent Iran building a nuclear weapon,” he said. “A nuclear weapon in Iranian hands would be contrary to Russian interests, and so it will not get one,”  he stressed.

article link
icubud: (Default)
2 cents: Egyptians thought they had it bad under Mubarak, wait till they experience the future. CES got what he wanted.

from Debka:

Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood has achieved the goal set at its foundation 84 years ago. Its candidate Mohammed Morsi was declared Sunday afternoon, June 24, victor of last week’s presidential election runoff with 51.73 percent, beating his rival, Ahmed Shafiq, former prime minister under the ousted Hosni Mubarak. Brotherhood supporters massed in tens of thousands at Tahrir Square set up a great cheer. Before the results were announced, they called for the Supreme Military Council ruling Egypt in the interim to step down and are now preparing to fight the generals to win for their president the sweeping powers assumed by the generals ahead of the election.
Although elected more or less democratically, Morsi and his party are expected to turn the Egyptian revolution into the cornerstone of an Islamic state more closely akin to the Islamic Republic of Iran than the democratic, secular state envisioned by the revolutionaries when they fought for Mubarak’s overthrow.
In time, Israeli will discover its three-decade old peace pact with Egypt is also destined to go by the board as the Islamist majority in parliament gives Egypt a new constitution broadly based on the Sharia.

The military council, though widely charged with usurping power, proved helpless against the Islamic tide which polarized rather than sweeping the country. The close election results showed Egypt to be deeply split into at least two large camps and this bodes ill for its future stability.
The generals will have no choice but to come to terms with the Muslim Brotherhood. But any deal they reach will be short-lived because the Islamists have the legislative power to enact laws for stripping the military elite of its privileges. Some of the generals may choose to retire rather than support the Brotherhood.

The first to read the writing on the wall was Mubarak’s former intelligence chief, Gen. Omar Suleiman, who dropped out of the presidential race at an early stage. The last DEBKA-Net-Weekly’s sources disclosed that Suleiman had boarded a flight to Munich, Germany last Wednesday, June 20. He was quick to foresee that the Muslim Brotherhood, backed by the Obama administration, was heading for rule over Egypt.
icubud: (Default)
2 cents: Egyptians thought they had it bad under Mubarak, wait till they experience the future. CES got what he wanted.

from Debka:

Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood has achieved the goal set at its foundation 84 years ago. Its candidate Mohammed Morsi was declared Sunday afternoon, June 24, victor of last week’s presidential election runoff with 51.73 percent, beating his rival, Ahmed Shafiq, former prime minister under the ousted Hosni Mubarak. Brotherhood supporters massed in tens of thousands at Tahrir Square set up a great cheer. Before the results were announced, they called for the Supreme Military Council ruling Egypt in the interim to step down and are now preparing to fight the generals to win for their president the sweeping powers assumed by the generals ahead of the election.
Although elected more or less democratically, Morsi and his party are expected to turn the Egyptian revolution into the cornerstone of an Islamic state more closely akin to the Islamic Republic of Iran than the democratic, secular state envisioned by the revolutionaries when they fought for Mubarak’s overthrow.
In time, Israeli will discover its three-decade old peace pact with Egypt is also destined to go by the board as the Islamist majority in parliament gives Egypt a new constitution broadly based on the Sharia.

The military council, though widely charged with usurping power, proved helpless against the Islamic tide which polarized rather than sweeping the country. The close election results showed Egypt to be deeply split into at least two large camps and this bodes ill for its future stability.
The generals will have no choice but to come to terms with the Muslim Brotherhood. But any deal they reach will be short-lived because the Islamists have the legislative power to enact laws for stripping the military elite of its privileges. Some of the generals may choose to retire rather than support the Brotherhood.

The first to read the writing on the wall was Mubarak’s former intelligence chief, Gen. Omar Suleiman, who dropped out of the presidential race at an early stage. The last DEBKA-Net-Weekly’s sources disclosed that Suleiman had boarded a flight to Munich, Germany last Wednesday, June 20. He was quick to foresee that the Muslim Brotherhood, backed by the Obama administration, was heading for rule over Egypt.
icubud: (Default)

Breaking News Alert

The New York Times

Sunday, June 24, 2012 -- 10:37 AM EDT

-----

 

Mohamed Morsi of Muslim Brotherhood Declared Winner of Egyptian Presidency

 

Election regulators named Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood the winner of Egypt’s first competitive presidential elections, handing the Islamist group a symbolic triumph and a new weapon in its struggle for power with the ruling military council.

 

His victory is an ambiguous milestone in Egypt’s promised transition to democracy after the ouster 16 months ago of President Hosni Mubarak. After an election that international monitors called credible, the military-led government has recognized an electoral victory by an opponent of military rule over a former air force general, Ahmed Shafik, who promised harmony with the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces. A public ballot count after the polls closed last weekend had already shown Mr. Morsi the winner, pending certification by a commission of Mubarak-appointed judges.

 

Read More:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/25/world/middleeast/mohamed-morsi-of-muslim-brotherhood-declared-as-egypts-president.html?emc=na

 

icubud: (Default)

2 cents: note comments in blue - this is what I am referring to in prior posts. Muslim Brotherhood is not actually about democracy.

A military power grab in Egypt

Tens of thousands of Egyptians poured into Cairo’s Tahrir Square to chant the name of the Islamist who they say won the presidential election.

What happened
An audacious power grab by the ruling military junta left Egypt in turmoil this week, as tens of thousands of Egyptians poured into Cairo’s Tahrir Square to chant the name of the Islamist who they say won the presidential election. Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohammed Mursi claimed to have won 52 percent of the vote in the first presidential race since the toppling 17 months ago of former dictator Hosni Mubarak. Mursi, a U.S.-educated engineer, promised to build a “modern, democratic state” for all Egyptians, whether Muslims or not. But his rival Ahmed Shafiq—Mubarak’s last prime minister and a close ally of the generals—accused the Brotherhood of “organized and persistent election fraud,” and declared that he had won the runoff.

Whoever is eventually declared the winner will have little authority. The Supreme Constitutional Court, still mainly Mubarak appointees, last week dissolved both houses of parliament, which the Brotherhood and other Islamists control. The junta then announced a new interim constitution that gives the generals the right to pass laws, control the budget, declare war, and steer the drafting of a permanent constitution. “This is a military coup against the people,” said Galal Osman, a protester in Tahrir Square. “We want the president that we elected to have all the powers of his office.”


What the editorials said
Egypt’s revolution “looks increasingly like a mirage,” said the Chicago Tribune. Fearful that the Muslim Brotherhood would control both the presidency and the parliament, the generals gutted both institutions. Many ordinary Egyptians dislike the Islamists’ religious dogma, but they fear a return to the dark days of Mubarak-style military rule even more. If the military won’t ease its iron-fisted grip on power, there will be more mass protests and violence. “Egypt was a big part of the Arab Spring. But it may be facing a long, hot summer.”

President Obama better get tough with the generals, said The Washington Post. So far, the State Department has issued only gentle warnings about possible damage to Egyptian-American relations. “We hope this message is being stated more bluntly in private.” If the generals “suffocate Egyptian democracy in the cradle,” they should lose the $1.3 billion in U.S. military aid they receive every year.


What the columnists said
This is a political masterstroke by the military, said Paul McGeough in The Sydney Morning Herald. The generals knew they could lose their top-dog status, wealth, and privileges if their man Shafiq lost and the Brotherhood controlled parliament, too. Now, the new president will be a figurehead; at the same time, the junta has “cleverly debased” the judiciary by ordering it to dissolve parliament—“so if anyone has a debate or grievance, where do they take it?” Egyptians are starting to lose faith in democracy, said Tim Lister in CNN.com. Many have soured on the Brotherhood, which used its parliamentary majority to bolster its own power rather than help ordinary people struggling in a broken economy. With the revolution flailing and leaderless, the military saw the perfect opportunity to regain control.

We should thank the generals for preventing a greater disaster, said Bret Stephens in The Wall Street Journal. The Muslim Brotherhood’s allies in parliament already sought to tighten Egypt’s strict divorce laws and roll back a ban on female genital mutilation—thus erasing gains by women and secularists. If the Brotherhood were allowed to control the entire government, it would have been free to pursue the ultimate goal expressed by the group’s de facto leader, Khairat al-Shater: “the Islamization of life.”

But what if this coup leads to civil war? said Jonathan Tobin in CommentaryMagazine.com. When the Algerian military overturned an election victory by Islamists in 1992, the result was a horrific, decade-long conflict in which some 200,000 people died. “If the Nile Valley becomes a war zone,” the violence could spill over into neighboring Israel and Gaza, further inflaming an already volatile region. That grim scenario makes a Muslim Brotherhood government—in an uneasy alliance with the generals—“look like an attractive alternative.”

icubud: (Default)

2 cents: note comments in blue - this is what I am referring to in prior posts. Muslim Brotherhood is not actually about democracy.

A military power grab in Egypt

Tens of thousands of Egyptians poured into Cairo’s Tahrir Square to chant the name of the Islamist who they say won the presidential election.

What happened
An audacious power grab by the ruling military junta left Egypt in turmoil this week, as tens of thousands of Egyptians poured into Cairo’s Tahrir Square to chant the name of the Islamist who they say won the presidential election. Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohammed Mursi claimed to have won 52 percent of the vote in the first presidential race since the toppling 17 months ago of former dictator Hosni Mubarak. Mursi, a U.S.-educated engineer, promised to build a “modern, democratic state” for all Egyptians, whether Muslims or not. But his rival Ahmed Shafiq—Mubarak’s last prime minister and a close ally of the generals—accused the Brotherhood of “organized and persistent election fraud,” and declared that he had won the runoff.

Whoever is eventually declared the winner will have little authority. The Supreme Constitutional Court, still mainly Mubarak appointees, last week dissolved both houses of parliament, which the Brotherhood and other Islamists control. The junta then announced a new interim constitution that gives the generals the right to pass laws, control the budget, declare war, and steer the drafting of a permanent constitution. “This is a military coup against the people,” said Galal Osman, a protester in Tahrir Square. “We want the president that we elected to have all the powers of his office.”


What the editorials said
Egypt’s revolution “looks increasingly like a mirage,” said the Chicago Tribune. Fearful that the Muslim Brotherhood would control both the presidency and the parliament, the generals gutted both institutions. Many ordinary Egyptians dislike the Islamists’ religious dogma, but they fear a return to the dark days of Mubarak-style military rule even more. If the military won’t ease its iron-fisted grip on power, there will be more mass protests and violence. “Egypt was a big part of the Arab Spring. But it may be facing a long, hot summer.”

President Obama better get tough with the generals, said The Washington Post. So far, the State Department has issued only gentle warnings about possible damage to Egyptian-American relations. “We hope this message is being stated more bluntly in private.” If the generals “suffocate Egyptian democracy in the cradle,” they should lose the $1.3 billion in U.S. military aid they receive every year.


What the columnists said
This is a political masterstroke by the military, said Paul McGeough in The Sydney Morning Herald. The generals knew they could lose their top-dog status, wealth, and privileges if their man Shafiq lost and the Brotherhood controlled parliament, too. Now, the new president will be a figurehead; at the same time, the junta has “cleverly debased” the judiciary by ordering it to dissolve parliament—“so if anyone has a debate or grievance, where do they take it?” Egyptians are starting to lose faith in democracy, said Tim Lister in CNN.com. Many have soured on the Brotherhood, which used its parliamentary majority to bolster its own power rather than help ordinary people struggling in a broken economy. With the revolution flailing and leaderless, the military saw the perfect opportunity to regain control.

We should thank the generals for preventing a greater disaster, said Bret Stephens in The Wall Street Journal. The Muslim Brotherhood’s allies in parliament already sought to tighten Egypt’s strict divorce laws and roll back a ban on female genital mutilation—thus erasing gains by women and secularists. If the Brotherhood were allowed to control the entire government, it would have been free to pursue the ultimate goal expressed by the group’s de facto leader, Khairat al-Shater: “the Islamization of life.”

But what if this coup leads to civil war? said Jonathan Tobin in CommentaryMagazine.com. When the Algerian military overturned an election victory by Islamists in 1992, the result was a horrific, decade-long conflict in which some 200,000 people died. “If the Nile Valley becomes a war zone,” the violence could spill over into neighboring Israel and Gaza, further inflaming an already volatile region. That grim scenario makes a Muslim Brotherhood government—in an uneasy alliance with the generals—“look like an attractive alternative.”

brewing

Jun. 24th, 2012 06:43 am
icubud: (Default)
Al Qaeda infiltrators from Libya are spearheading much of this month’s anti-Israel violence from Sinai and the Gaza Strip - a dangerous development Israel, Hamas, Egypt and the US prefer to conceal. It appears to tie in with the arrival of al Qaeda’s ex-Iraq fighters in Syria as part of its leader's master plan. Deeply concerned to check the spillover from Libya into Egypt, Cairo has posted its elite counter-terrorist “999 unit” in El Arish, on Egypt’s border with the Gaza Strip and along the northern sector of its frontier with Israel.

whole story here


2 cents: What Iran and other right and far right Muslims want is a war with Israel so as - according to their theory - to unite all Muslims and Arabs.

Here we go

Jun. 19th, 2012 06:53 am
icubud: (Default)

Egypt: It has already started…(see prior post for context)

Debka: The US backs Brotherhood

NYT: Egypt’s Democracy Interrupted

Here we go

Jun. 19th, 2012 06:53 am
icubud: (Default)

Egypt: It has already started…(see prior post for context)

Debka: The US backs Brotherhood

NYT: Egypt’s Democracy Interrupted

icubud: (Problems_by_ThisLatestPlague)

The rupture between the US and Israel over Iran’s nuclear program widened further Friday, May 25  when Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and Defense Minister Ehud Barak decided not to be available to hear the briefing brought to Jerusalem from Baghdad by Undersecretary of State Wendy Sherman who headed the US delegation to the Six Power talks. The report she delivered to National Security Adviser Yaakov Amidror and Foreign Ministry Director-General Rafi Barak was that no progress had been achieved in Baghdad due to Iran’s refusal to budge on its “right” to enrich uranium at low (3.5-5 percent) or high (20 percent) levels or shut down the Fordo nuclear plant near Qom.
Although the participants agreed to reconvene in Moscow in three weeks, the Iranian delegation stressed there would be no progress until the US and the other five world powers (Britain, France, Russia, Germany and China) recognized Iran’s absolute “right” as a signatory of the Non-Proliferation Treaty to enrich uranium.

Meanwhile, every day spent on diplomacy is thoroughly exploited by Iran to zip ahead with its nuclear plans.

whole article here

2 cents:

Iran knowing that it has a sympathetic ear in the chief empty suit PLUS the fact that he is busy meddling in back channels KNOWS it has the idiot by the nose and now can lead him along as long as they want -- wherever they want. Iran's hope that in using back channels that it would sever ties (weak as they are/were) between Israel and USA but more specifically between Netanyahu and Obama. Iran believes if it can get Israel to act before the US election that it will actually isolate Israel further and the key to that isolation is away from US. HOWEVER if Israel would hold out and the US election results in the replacement of the the CES - then Iran is in a FAR WORSE spot because it will undoubtedly be looking at a fierce Israel supporter and one that is willing to crush Iran with military might. Israel knows that each day Iran is left alone to continue working, results in a day closer to their ultimate unstated goal.

A wild card in this whole thing is the arrogance of CES. Will the arrogance take him down the road of being a back channel baby believing he alone can bring peace or will it go that he will become obnoxious at the inability of Iran to realize that he is right and that they need to do what he says?

So how is that for a crucible of activity?

What would you do if you were Netanyahu?
 

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