Commuting

Jul. 28th, 2012 02:25 pm
icubud: (Problems_by_ThisLatestPlague)

I found this interesting and thought some of you might too.
_
commutingdogsinrussia

Each morning, like clockwork, they board the subway, off to begin their daily routine amidst the hustle and bustle of the city.

But these aren’t just any daily commuters. These are stray dogs who live in the outskirts of Moscow Russia and commute on the underground trains to and from the city centre in search of food scraps.

Then after a hard day scavenging and begging on the streets, they hop back on the train and return to the suburbs where they spend the night.

Experts studying the dogs, who usually choose the quietest carriages at the front and back of the train, say they even work together to make sure they get off at the right stop – after learning to judge the length of time they need to spend on the train.

Scientists believe this phenomenon began after the Soviet Union collapsed in the 1990s, and Russia’s new capitalists moved industrial complexes from the city centre to the suburbs.

Dr Andrei Poiarkov, of the Moscow Ecology and Evolution Institute, said: “These complexes were used by homeless dogs as shelters, so the dogs had to move together with their houses. Because the best scavenging for food is in the city centre, the dogs had to learn how to travel on the subway – to get to the centre in the morning, then back home in the evening, just like people.”

Dr Poiarkov told how the dogs like to play during their daily commute. He said: “They jump on the train seconds before the doors shut, risking their tails getting jammed. They do it for fun. And sometimes they fall asleep and get off at the wrong stop.”

The dogs have also amazingly learned to use traffic lights to cross the road safely, said Dr Poiarkov. And they use cunning tactics to obtain tasty morsels of shawarma, a kebab-like snack popular in Moscow.

With children the dogs “play cute” by putting their heads on youngsters’ knees and staring pleadingly into their eyes to win sympathy – and scraps.

Dr Poiarkov added: “Dogs are surprisingly good psychologists.”
http://myencephalonjourneys.tumblr.com/

Commuting

Jul. 28th, 2012 02:25 pm
icubud: (Problems_by_ThisLatestPlague)

I found this interesting and thought some of you might too.
_
commutingdogsinrussia

Each morning, like clockwork, they board the subway, off to begin their daily routine amidst the hustle and bustle of the city.

But these aren’t just any daily commuters. These are stray dogs who live in the outskirts of Moscow Russia and commute on the underground trains to and from the city centre in search of food scraps.

Then after a hard day scavenging and begging on the streets, they hop back on the train and return to the suburbs where they spend the night.

Experts studying the dogs, who usually choose the quietest carriages at the front and back of the train, say they even work together to make sure they get off at the right stop – after learning to judge the length of time they need to spend on the train.

Scientists believe this phenomenon began after the Soviet Union collapsed in the 1990s, and Russia’s new capitalists moved industrial complexes from the city centre to the suburbs.

Dr Andrei Poiarkov, of the Moscow Ecology and Evolution Institute, said: “These complexes were used by homeless dogs as shelters, so the dogs had to move together with their houses. Because the best scavenging for food is in the city centre, the dogs had to learn how to travel on the subway – to get to the centre in the morning, then back home in the evening, just like people.”

Dr Poiarkov told how the dogs like to play during their daily commute. He said: “They jump on the train seconds before the doors shut, risking their tails getting jammed. They do it for fun. And sometimes they fall asleep and get off at the wrong stop.”

The dogs have also amazingly learned to use traffic lights to cross the road safely, said Dr Poiarkov. And they use cunning tactics to obtain tasty morsels of shawarma, a kebab-like snack popular in Moscow.

With children the dogs “play cute” by putting their heads on youngsters’ knees and staring pleadingly into their eyes to win sympathy – and scraps.

Dr Poiarkov added: “Dogs are surprisingly good psychologists.”
http://myencephalonjourneys.tumblr.com/

icubud: (Default)

The high point of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s noteworthy 90-minute talk with Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu in Jerusalem Monday, June 25, was Putin’s firm assertion that Iran will not get a nuclear bomb. This is disclosed exclusively by debkafile’s Jerusalem and Moscow sources.
He also dismissed reports that the third round in Moscow of six-power talks with Iran (June 18-19) led nowhere, stressing they were serious and substantial. The next round taking place in Istanbul on July for technical discussions is, according to the Russian president, of prime importance. For the first time, he explained, the nuclear negotiations with Iran will get down to the core issues and would therefore of greater significance  than the “Ashton-Jalili” sessions.
(He was referring to European foreign executive Catherine Ashton who chairs the negotiations and Saeed Jalili, senior Iranian negotiator.)
Putin corrected the general impression that Russia has confined itself to the role of passive bystander in the bargaining with Iran: Quite the reverse, he said: Moscow has been proactively working for accord behind the scenes and its “input” to the process “is considerable.”
Although the word “intelligence” was not mentioned, it was clearly intimated by the Russian visitor when he said, “We [Russians] know more about what is going on with regard to Iran’s (nuclear) capabilities than the Americans.”
It was Putin’s way to scoff at Israel for investing so much time and strategic assets in endless wrangling over how to handle the Iranian threat with American security, military and intelligence chiefs, when the Netanyahu government would be better served by sparing a fraction of that time for talking to Moscow.

In conclusion, he stressed to Netanyahu that it was unnecessary for Israel to use military force against Iran’s nuclear program. Israel knows exactly how much Russia has done to prevent Iran building a nuclear weapon,” he said. “A nuclear weapon in Iranian hands would be contrary to Russian interests, and so it will not get one,”  he stressed.

article link
icubud: (Default)

Russia threatens to strike NATO missile defense sites

"Russia’s most senior military officer said Thursday that Moscow would pre-emptively strike and destroy U.S.-led NATO missile defense sites in Eastern Europe if talks with Washington about the developing system continue to stall.

 

“A decision to use destructive force pre-emptively will be taken if the situation worsens,” Russian Chief of General Staff Nikolai Makarov said at an international missile defense conference in Moscow attended by senior U.S. and NATO officials."


2 cents:
Clearly the snubbing of the chief empty suit by Russia continues.

icubud: (Vapor Trails)
Russia will deploy new missiles aimed at U.S. missile defense sites in Europe if Washington goes ahead with the planned shield despite Russia's concerns, President Dmitry Medvedev said Wednesday.
Russia will station missiles in its westernmost Kaliningrad region and other areas if Russia and NATO fail to reach a deal on the U.S.-led missile defense plans, he said in a tough statement that seemed to be aimed at rallying domestic support.
Russia considers the plans for missile shields in Europe, including in Romania and Poland, to be a threat to its nuclear forces, but the Obama administration insists they are meant to fend off a potential threat from Iran.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2011/11/23/medvedev-russia-may-target-missile-defense-sites/#ixzz1eXdOjbev
 
2 cents:
From the get go O has damaged the relationship we had with America and seems at the three year mark it still is in bad shape.
I seem to remember that ties with them had been quite strong under Bush.
Being a proud people they probably were immediately turned off by his arrogance and belligerence. You know the smug face, his look of scorn - we need to get this person with illusions of grandeur out of the Oval Office.
icubud: (Vapor Trails)
Russia will deploy new missiles aimed at U.S. missile defense sites in Europe if Washington goes ahead with the planned shield despite Russia's concerns, President Dmitry Medvedev said Wednesday.
Russia will station missiles in its westernmost Kaliningrad region and other areas if Russia and NATO fail to reach a deal on the U.S.-led missile defense plans, he said in a tough statement that seemed to be aimed at rallying domestic support.
Russia considers the plans for missile shields in Europe, including in Romania and Poland, to be a threat to its nuclear forces, but the Obama administration insists they are meant to fend off a potential threat from Iran.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2011/11/23/medvedev-russia-may-target-missile-defense-sites/#ixzz1eXdOjbev
 
2 cents:
From the get go O has damaged the relationship we had with America and seems at the three year mark it still is in bad shape.
I seem to remember that ties with them had been quite strong under Bush.
Being a proud people they probably were immediately turned off by his arrogance and belligerence. You know the smug face, his look of scorn - we need to get this person with illusions of grandeur out of the Oval Office.

Stuxnet

Oct. 9th, 2010 09:32 am
icubud: (Default)

If you remember about a couple months before Russia finished providing the necessary equipment and building of Bushehr the US and Israel were having meetings that were reported as begging Russia not to go through with the agreement and purchases to Iran to make Bushehr operational. Now with the knowledge that Iran's computers are in essence sending destructive instructions to all the machinery in what has been called the worst and most diabolical new computer worm - Stuxnet my belief - no proof of course - just looking at the end results --- is that US & Israel (the creators of malware) were providing the instructions and files to download onto the computers before Russia finished installing and turned on the reactor. Russia gets the $$ from the sale and contracts and Israel and USA dealt a crippling blow to Iran's nuclear program without a bomb being dropped.


The whole thing was nicely summed up (as usual) in the October 8th issue of the Week magazine.

Is the U.S. “already at war with Iran?” asked Robert Dreyfuss in The Nation. For several years now, there have been reports that the government has been trying to sabotage Iran’s nuclear industry. That secret war may have just become visible, in the form of a diabolical new computer “worm” called Stuxnet. Cybersecurity experts say Stuxnet is the most sophisticated, and potentially devastating, bit of “malware” ever devised, with the ability to spread quickly, take control of industrial computers, and reprogram them to destroy hardware. Experts say the worm could only have been created with the resources and expertise of a nation-state. Its ultimate target? That remains uncertain, although Iran admits that 30,000 of its computers have already been infected, including some at the Bushehr nuclear power plant, whose start-up has been delayed. Stuxnet may also be impairing Iran’s computer-controlled uranium centrifuges, which mysteriously have lost 30 percent of production capacity, thereby setting back any plans to make a bomb. “Make no mistake: This is serious stuff.”

Stuxnet, in fact, is the first true cyberweapon, said Mark Clayton in The Christian Science Monitor. Security experts say the complex worm is designed to “cross from the digital realm to the physical world—to destroy something.” Ralph Langer, a German researcher who has studied Stuxnet intensively, says the worm is programmed to attack one specific factory, power plant, or other industrial installation somewhere in the world, and that once it reaches its target, it will send a code: “DEADF007.” Then something bad happens. “Something big,” Langer says. Who sent it? It could be the U.S.—or Israel, which is also developing cyberwarfare capability.

Whatever the source or the outcome, Stuxnet ushers in a frightening new era, said Jed Babbin in Forbes.com. China, Russia, the U.S., and other nations have been quietly engaging in cyberwarfare for some time now, but this worm represents a major technological escalation—like the change from the “muzzle-loading muskets” of the 18th and 19th centuries to modern rifles. “This is what nation-states build if their only other option would be to go to war,” one security expert said. Iran may be the target this time, but let’s not gloat. In the future, a foreign worm could shut down or destroy America’s electrical utilities and its industrial and nuclear facilities. Welcome to the brave new cyberworld.

The link below is to today's story in which Iran admits Stuxnet has crippled their nuclear facilities.


http://www.foxnews.com/world/2010/10/09/iran-acknowledges-espionage-nuclear-facilities/print

Stuxnet

Oct. 9th, 2010 09:32 am
icubud: (Default)

If you remember about a couple months before Russia finished providing the necessary equipment and building of Bushehr the US and Israel were having meetings that were reported as begging Russia not to go through with the agreement and purchases to Iran to make Bushehr operational. Now with the knowledge that Iran's computers are in essence sending destructive instructions to all the machinery in what has been called the worst and most diabolical new computer worm - Stuxnet my belief - no proof of course - just looking at the end results --- is that US & Israel (the creators of malware) were providing the instructions and files to download onto the computers before Russia finished installing and turned on the reactor. Russia gets the $$ from the sale and contracts and Israel and USA dealt a crippling blow to Iran's nuclear program without a bomb being dropped.


The whole thing was nicely summed up (as usual) in the October 8th issue of the Week magazine.

Is the U.S. “already at war with Iran?” asked Robert Dreyfuss in The Nation. For several years now, there have been reports that the government has been trying to sabotage Iran’s nuclear industry. That secret war may have just become visible, in the form of a diabolical new computer “worm” called Stuxnet. Cybersecurity experts say Stuxnet is the most sophisticated, and potentially devastating, bit of “malware” ever devised, with the ability to spread quickly, take control of industrial computers, and reprogram them to destroy hardware. Experts say the worm could only have been created with the resources and expertise of a nation-state. Its ultimate target? That remains uncertain, although Iran admits that 30,000 of its computers have already been infected, including some at the Bushehr nuclear power plant, whose start-up has been delayed. Stuxnet may also be impairing Iran’s computer-controlled uranium centrifuges, which mysteriously have lost 30 percent of production capacity, thereby setting back any plans to make a bomb. “Make no mistake: This is serious stuff.”

Stuxnet, in fact, is the first true cyberweapon, said Mark Clayton in The Christian Science Monitor. Security experts say the complex worm is designed to “cross from the digital realm to the physical world—to destroy something.” Ralph Langer, a German researcher who has studied Stuxnet intensively, says the worm is programmed to attack one specific factory, power plant, or other industrial installation somewhere in the world, and that once it reaches its target, it will send a code: “DEADF007.” Then something bad happens. “Something big,” Langer says. Who sent it? It could be the U.S.—or Israel, which is also developing cyberwarfare capability.

Whatever the source or the outcome, Stuxnet ushers in a frightening new era, said Jed Babbin in Forbes.com. China, Russia, the U.S., and other nations have been quietly engaging in cyberwarfare for some time now, but this worm represents a major technological escalation—like the change from the “muzzle-loading muskets” of the 18th and 19th centuries to modern rifles. “This is what nation-states build if their only other option would be to go to war,” one security expert said. Iran may be the target this time, but let’s not gloat. In the future, a foreign worm could shut down or destroy America’s electrical utilities and its industrial and nuclear facilities. Welcome to the brave new cyberworld.

The link below is to today's story in which Iran admits Stuxnet has crippled their nuclear facilities.


http://www.foxnews.com/world/2010/10/09/iran-acknowledges-espionage-nuclear-facilities/print
icubud: (Default)
What follows below is a bit troubling. Proof again that all is not right.



Russian submarines are hunting down British Vanguard boats in a return to Cold War tactics not seen for 25 years, Navy chiefs have warned.

A specially upgraded Russian Akula class submarine has been caught trying to record the acoustic signature made by the Vanguard submarines that carry Trident nuclear missiles, according to senior Navy officers.

British submariners have also reported that they are experiencing the highest number of "contacts" with Russian submarines since 1987.

If the Russians are able to obtain a recording of the unique noise of the boat's propellers it would have serious implications for Britain's nuclear deterrent. Using its sophisticated sonar, the Akula would be able to track Vanguards and potentially sink them before they could launch their Trident D4 missiles.

The Daily Telegraph has learnt that, within the past six months, a Russian Akula entered the North Atlantic and attempted to track a Vanguard. The incident has remained secret until now.

It is understood that the Russians stood off Faslane, where the British nuclear force is based, and waited for a Trident-carrying boat to come out for its three-month patrol to provide the Continuous At Sea Deterrent.

While patrolling in the North Atlantic, there are a limited number of places the Vanguard is permitted to go and it is thought that the Akula attempted to track it on several occasions.

Navy commanders are understood to have ordered a Trafalgar-class hunter-killer submarine to protect the Vanguard. A recording of the Akula was made by the Trafalgar submarine's sonar operators and has been played to The Daily Telegraph.

"The Russians have been playing games with us, the Americans and French in the North Atlantic," a senior Navy commander said.

"We have put a lot of resources into protecting Trident because we cannot afford by any stretch to let the Russians learn the acoustic profile of one of our bombers as that would compromise the deterrent."


icubud: (Default)
What follows below is a bit troubling. Proof again that all is not right.



Russian submarines are hunting down British Vanguard boats in a return to Cold War tactics not seen for 25 years, Navy chiefs have warned.

A specially upgraded Russian Akula class submarine has been caught trying to record the acoustic signature made by the Vanguard submarines that carry Trident nuclear missiles, according to senior Navy officers.

British submariners have also reported that they are experiencing the highest number of "contacts" with Russian submarines since 1987.

If the Russians are able to obtain a recording of the unique noise of the boat's propellers it would have serious implications for Britain's nuclear deterrent. Using its sophisticated sonar, the Akula would be able to track Vanguards and potentially sink them before they could launch their Trident D4 missiles.

The Daily Telegraph has learnt that, within the past six months, a Russian Akula entered the North Atlantic and attempted to track a Vanguard. The incident has remained secret until now.

It is understood that the Russians stood off Faslane, where the British nuclear force is based, and waited for a Trident-carrying boat to come out for its three-month patrol to provide the Continuous At Sea Deterrent.

While patrolling in the North Atlantic, there are a limited number of places the Vanguard is permitted to go and it is thought that the Akula attempted to track it on several occasions.

Navy commanders are understood to have ordered a Trafalgar-class hunter-killer submarine to protect the Vanguard. A recording of the Akula was made by the Trafalgar submarine's sonar operators and has been played to The Daily Telegraph.

"The Russians have been playing games with us, the Americans and French in the North Atlantic," a senior Navy commander said.

"We have put a lot of resources into protecting Trident because we cannot afford by any stretch to let the Russians learn the acoustic profile of one of our bombers as that would compromise the deterrent."


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