icubud: (web bot)
From The Week magazine August 10, 2012 edition - page 19

 
Spending evenings in front of a glowing computer, TV, or cellphone screen can put you at risk of depression, Science News reports. Nighttime exposure to light from gadgets has already been shown to contribute to insomnia, cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Now, a new study shows that screen glow can cause mood-related changes in the brain. For weeks, researchers exposed hamsters to eight hours a night of dim light—like that from a TV screen—instead of their usual eight hours of pitch darkness. They found that the rodents became lethargic and ignored their favorite sugary treats, suggesting that they weren’t deriving “pleasure out of activities they once enjoyed”—a major indication of depression in humans, says study author Tracy Bedrosian. The rodents’ brains also showed the same kinds of changes in the hippocampus that are common in depressed people. “The good news,” Bedrosian says, is that the damage disappeared and the rodents’ behavior returned to normal after researchers took the night lights away, meaning that simply powering down earlier may “undo some of the harmful effects” that late-night gadget users face. Over the past 50 years, depression rates in the U.S. have increased dramatically as artificial lighting at night has become more common.
icubud: (web bot)
From The Week magazine August 10, 2012 edition - page 19

 
Spending evenings in front of a glowing computer, TV, or cellphone screen can put you at risk of depression, Science News reports. Nighttime exposure to light from gadgets has already been shown to contribute to insomnia, cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Now, a new study shows that screen glow can cause mood-related changes in the brain. For weeks, researchers exposed hamsters to eight hours a night of dim light—like that from a TV screen—instead of their usual eight hours of pitch darkness. They found that the rodents became lethargic and ignored their favorite sugary treats, suggesting that they weren’t deriving “pleasure out of activities they once enjoyed”—a major indication of depression in humans, says study author Tracy Bedrosian. The rodents’ brains also showed the same kinds of changes in the hippocampus that are common in depressed people. “The good news,” Bedrosian says, is that the damage disappeared and the rodents’ behavior returned to normal after researchers took the night lights away, meaning that simply powering down earlier may “undo some of the harmful effects” that late-night gadget users face. Over the past 50 years, depression rates in the U.S. have increased dramatically as artificial lighting at night has become more common.
icubud: (Earth from space - a NASA photo)
From The Week magazine August 10, 2012 edition - page 19

Gazing at a beautiful landscape or listening to a majestic symphony may make people feel less rushed, more patient, and more compassionate toward others. Stanford University researchers have discovered that awe—as opposed to joy or other positive emotions—gives people the sense that time has slowed down. That feeling, in turn, has a major impact on “everyday decision making,” study author Melanie Rudd tellsLiveScience.com. She and her colleagues showed one group of volunteers a video of awe-inspiring scenes, such as waterfalls and breaching whales, and another group a happy video featuring confetti and a parade. The researchers also had participants read or write about either an awesome experience or a blander one. When they quizzed the volunteers afterward, those who had watched, read about, or recalled an awesome moment were more likely to report feeling unhurried. They were also more apt to agree to donate their time to charity, and to prefer spending money on experiences, such as seeing a play, rather than on material goods. Researchers say the participants reported that the “small dose of awe” had given them “a momentary boost in life satisfaction.” 
icubud: (Earth from space - a NASA photo)
From The Week magazine August 10, 2012 edition - page 19

Gazing at a beautiful landscape or listening to a majestic symphony may make people feel less rushed, more patient, and more compassionate toward others. Stanford University researchers have discovered that awe—as opposed to joy or other positive emotions—gives people the sense that time has slowed down. That feeling, in turn, has a major impact on “everyday decision making,” study author Melanie Rudd tellsLiveScience.com. She and her colleagues showed one group of volunteers a video of awe-inspiring scenes, such as waterfalls and breaching whales, and another group a happy video featuring confetti and a parade. The researchers also had participants read or write about either an awesome experience or a blander one. When they quizzed the volunteers afterward, those who had watched, read about, or recalled an awesome moment were more likely to report feeling unhurried. They were also more apt to agree to donate their time to charity, and to prefer spending money on experiences, such as seeing a play, rather than on material goods. Researchers say the participants reported that the “small dose of awe” had given them “a momentary boost in life satisfaction.” 
icubud: (Default)
An article I read about two months ago in The Week that deals with mild electrical brain stimulation.
Personally - I'm game.
icubud: (Default)
An article I read about two months ago in The Week that deals with mild electrical brain stimulation.
Personally - I'm game.

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